Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Challenge Link-Up Post: Classic with a Color in the Title


Please link your reviews for your Classic with a Color in the Title here.  This is only for the Classic with a Color in the Title category. Examples include The Woman in White, Anne of Green Gables, The Red and the Black, etc. (Silver, gold, etc. also count).  

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (The Black Tulip)."


17 comments:

  1. The Woman in White was the first book I have read by Wilkie Collins. I thoroughly enjoyed the convoluted plot, the method that Collins used to advance the plot, and the outstanding character development. I look forward to reading The Moonstone.

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    1. Wilkie Collins is wonderful. I also enjoyed Armadale and No Name (Armadale has an especially convoluted plot, with four different characters named Armadale!) If you like Victorian sensation novels, I also recommend Mary Elizabeth Braddon, she wrote a ton of novels which are mostly out of print but easy to get free on Gutenberg and ibooks.

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    2. I liked Moonstone more than The Woman in White.

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    3. I read in the introduction to Trollope's Ralph the Heir that having different characters with the same name was a bit of a fad among Victorian writers of the time. Sheesh, readers then must have a lot more tolerance for confusion and fog than we post-moderns do.....

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  2. My book for this prompt was White Nights, by Dostoyevsky… I read it in Spanish. I arrived to it because it was mentioned in After the Quake by Murakami. I don't know if it was because I was forced to read him in school, but I don't remember enjoying any Dostoyevsky like I did White Nights <3

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  3. I read Agatha Christie's The Man in the Brown Suit - I love Christie, but this isn't one of my favorites. Not a Miss Marple; not a Poirot. The story is told by a young woman with excerpts from an older man's journal. I didn't care for the writing style.

    https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2195540157

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  4. If I see a Virago book in a used book store I buy it. So I had owned Red Pottage for years until the classics challenge caused me to read it. I enjoyed it greatly and can imagine why it sold well in 1899. It's a `new woman' book which is both powerfully disruptive and witty. I grew up in a small town in England so some of the satire about the Anglican church and the social hierarchy rang very true. A very good read.

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    1. I know what you mean about the Viragos -- I'm always drawn to the green spines in used bookshops. I loved Red Pottage and was half wishing I had saved it for the challenge this year, it was one of my favorite reads in 2017.

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  5. I read The Chinese Orange Mystery by Ellery Queen. It was...strange. I couldn't tell if it was ripping off Sherlock Holmes or making fun of it so I didn't know how to take it. I don't think I would read any more of the series.

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  6. The Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie - To understand Agatha Christie you must understand that it is never the obvious person.

    https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2172213593

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  7. "The Red House Mystery" by AA Milne (yes, THAT AA Milne!) His only mystery novel. I'd call it a cozy mystery with a lot of humorous banter between the amateur sleuths.

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  8. Scarlet Pimpernel- it felt slightly sacrilegious that I had seen the movie and musical so many times and had never actually read the book.

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  9. My choice for this category was Under the Greenwood Tree, by Thomas Hardy. A bit of a non-event, as far as the plot went, and not an easy read either :(

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  10. Read The Children of Green Knowe, a classic I'd never heard of until a few weeks ago... I was disappointed.

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  11. I read A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Canon Doyle. I loved the Sherlock Holmes short stories when I was a kid and was glad to be able to read my first Sherlock Holmes novel. Also good that it was the very first Sherlock/Watson story in the long line of short stories/novels featuring the duo. Enjoyed and wondered if the writers of CSI and other forensics shows read these books. Sherlock was the original fictional forensics detective.

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  12. I read The Woman in White, by Wilkie Collins. I liked it a leeeetle less than The Moonstone, but I still thouroughly enjoyed the read and am looking forward to reading more by Collins.

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  13. I notice that scarlet seems to be a very popular colour, here. I read The Scarlet Letter, and in a way it reminds me of that Les Miserables song. "Red, the colour of desire! Black, the colour of despair!"

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