Saturday, January 5, 2019

Challenge Link-Up Post: Classic Comic Novel


Please link your reviews for your Classic Comic Novel here.  This is only for the Classic Comic Novel category. This can be any novel that is humorous or satirical; since humor is subjective, it's up to the reader to decide. If you think Crime and Punishment is funny, go ahead and use it, but please explain why in your post.
   
If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Three Men in a Boat)." 


9 comments:

  1. Two Strange Ladies by Harry Stephen Keeler from me.

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  2. I read Cold Comfort Farm for the comedy. What a weird, wacky ride :)

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  3. "Queen Lucia" is the first of the Mapp & Lucia comedies by EF Benson.

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  4. Hi Karen,
    Quick question for you about a book for the reading challenge. I had read a short story collection for the "comedy" category.... which I later realized is actually called the "comic novel" category.

    Does my "My Man Jeeves" count for this??

    I had already linked up my review here... but let me know! I can find another title to read for this category (if needed) -- I'll just follow whatever you say. :D

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    1. Short story collections count, so yes. I listed it as Comic Novel to distinguish it from comic plays, since plays are only in the Classic Play category.

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    2. Awesome! Thank you for the clarification.

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  5. I chose Sprig Muslin, a Georgette Heyer Regency romance, for my comic novel. :)

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  6. I read Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, and absolutely loved it! I haven't written a proper review yet, but I laughed out loud multiple times at the use of words and language. Amazing writing- so chaotic, so funny. The only downside was the portrayal of women, even for the time it was set and written in.

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