Saturday, January 5, 2019

Challenge Link-Up Post: Classic in Translation


Please link your reviews for your Classic in Translation here.  This is only for the Classic in Translation category.  These should all be classics that were originally written in a language other than your primary language; that is, if you are a native English speaker, it should be a classic written in another language other than English.  If you are not a native English speaker, it could be in English (or any other language, other than your primary language). If you want to read the book in its original language, that's fine too!

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Les Miserables)."


18 comments:

  1. First review done, 11 to go! -Rachel Aster Anchan

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  2. "Grand Hotel" was an excellent read! Highly recommended.

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  3. Karen, I'm trying to add my link -u, but it keeps asking me to accept the privacy policy, but there is no box.

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    1. NVM. I tried a different browser, and that worked.

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  4. Just finished Papillon Liked it, didn't love it. I have a little problem (actually a big problem) with Charriere's reliability.

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  5. Just finished Tolstoy's War and Peace: https://janegs.blogspot.com/2019/04/war-and-peace.html

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  6. My first Emile Zola, Therese Raquin, won't be my last :)

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  7. Mine choice for this category is The Little Prince. A short, sweet, and very thought-provoking read :)

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  8. My choice was de Maupassant's Like Death. I'd been meaning to read it for ages, but probably wouldn't have gotten around to it without the Challenge, which has really helped me expand my reading. I liked this particular book (didn't love it) BUT really became interested in looking at more of de Maupassant's work (probably short stories, of which he's an acknowledged master).

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  9. I finished this back in February and apparently never linked it up here. The book is just as weird as the movie.

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  10. I was totally taken over by "Bonjour Tristesse" while I was reading it, but afterwards I felt that it's world was so enclosed and disconnected to real life as I have experienced it that I didn't feel able to connect to it in my own life. As a seventeen-year-old I certainly believed that French teenagers were more mature than my mouse-like English self at that age, but even so I am still more astonished by Sagan's youthful skill than I expected to be.

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  11. Hi, Karen.

    My apologies. I believe the first link is a wrong one, so feel free to delete it.

    Thanks!

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  12. Read my first Jules Verne and loved it! Cannot wait to get to the others! (Have not yet written a review due to exhaustion, but hope I will be forgiven!)

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  13. I read Candide, by Voltaire. I did like it, but I didn't love it quite as much as I thought I would - I was possibly not in the right mood for it.

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  14. This is my last category! I'm going to see how many I can double up on now! I read We by Yevgeny Zamyatin. I really enjoyed this dystopian novel.

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  15. I read the Trial by Franz Kafka.

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