Thursday, January 9, 2020

Challenge Link-Up Post: Adapted Classic


Please link your reviews for your Adapted Classic here. This is only for the Adapted Classic category. This is any classic book that's been adapted for a movie or TV series. If you like, you can watch an adaptation and include your thoughts in your review. 

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Bleak House)." 


7 comments:

  1. I LOVED reading A Room with a View, but now I'm torn on whether or not to watch one of the film adaptations. It always seems to ruin the beautiful picture of the book I created in my mind. Anyone have an opinion? Kiel @ Tuning Hearts

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    1. The Merchant Ivory film is film adaptation at its best. It will put pictures in your head but they are eminently the right pictures. The casting is perfect and the locations glorious.

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  2. I chose Vanity Fair for this category, and loved it! Have just finished watching the recent BBC series which was also great.

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  3. "The Mysterious Affair at Styles" was the first Poirot mystery Agatha Christie wrote and was adapted as part of a long-running TV series.

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  4. I read Treasure Island for the first... and it ruined the movie Treasure Planet for me, which was a favorite of mine growing up.

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  5. The Makioka Sisters provided a great demonstration of how different media tell the same story in different ways. Often times a film adaptation will frustrate me because of what is left out, but here the same point is made through the visual medium. I have been told of the beauty of the cherry blossom season in Japan, and it is an important element of the book, but in the film the stunning depiction of the trees in full bloom play a role in showing how cut off the family is from the harsh realities of the pre-WWII world.

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