Monday, January 5, 2015

Challenge Link-Up Post: Non-fiction Classic


Please link your reviews for your Non-fiction Classic here.  This is only for the Non-Fiction Classic category.  A memoir, biography, essays, travel, this can be any nonfiction work that's considered a classic, or a nonfiction work by a classic author.

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Travels With Charley)."  



9 comments:

  1. I have a question concerning my choice in this category. Your sign-up post says that all books for this challenge have to been published at least 50 years ago, "The only exception is books that were published posthumously but written at least 50 years ago." In that light I chose Laura Ingalls Wilder's autobiography, Pioneer Girl. It was just published last year, but it was written before her Little House books. But I got to thinking that even though it was known that she wrote it, and was probably available in museums or collections, I don't know if it would really count as a classic for this challenge since it has only come available to the public so recently, so I wanted to ask about it. I'm still planning on reading it, just not sure whether I can claim it for the Nonfiction Classic category.

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  2. I'm starting to make some headway on all the books I started at ONCE for the challenge! :) Enjoyed Lewis' The Weight of Glory...still thinking about it...

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  3. I posted my link to "The Communist Manifesto" for this category.

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  4. Abe Lincoln Grows Up is a wonderful and readable Lincoln biography.

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  5. I have read Agatha Christie's "The Grand Tour". It was published in 2012, but posthumously since the original letters were written i 1922.

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  6. Isabella Bird's engrossing travel journal told in letters "Unbeaten Tracks in Japan" will be in my thoughts every time I am about to `winge' because I am in a middle seat on a plane. Bird's cure for depression was to plunge into deepest Japan, ford rivers, meet primitive people and tell about it all in a manner so vivid I felt I was `watching' a documentary.

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  7. Just posted the link to my review of Dickens' American Notes.

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  8. I just posted my first entry for non-fiction :-). It's about the revolutions of 1848 in Paris and Berlin from the point of view of a famous German woman writer of the time, but certain passages are amazingly topical today.

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  9. Just finished my 12th book... An Autobiography by Anthony Trollope. I discovered him this year and loved every word of his books!

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